Mohammed Atef’s Technical blog

Oslo Model Lifecycle

When you create a model, you run through a series of steps to fully develop the model, build it, and deploy it. In these steps, the model takes on different forms as it is manipulated by different tools. This topic describes the lifecycles for internal and external application models.
The Lifecycle for Internal Application Models
An internal application model does not have a connection to an external application. we will use the following tools during the lifecycle of an internal application:
• The Oslo model editor including the Quadrant Workflow Designer and the Composite Application Designer
• The Repository, a SQL Server 2008 database for storing models
• Visual Studio 2010, including its build tools and Workflow Designer
• Server tools to create and import a build package.
To create, build, and deploy an internal application model, you would perform the following steps:
1- In the Workflow Designer in the Oslo Model Editor, create a new instance of the workflow model. Automatically saved and save the model instance into the Oslo Repository.
2- In the Model Editor, export the model instance from the R, saving it as an XAML file to a directory on your hard disk. This uses the XAML Serializer to serialize the model from the Repository into XAML files.
3- In Visual Studio, create a new Workflow project, and add the generated XAML files (a workflow) to the project.
4- If you need custom logic from C# code, implement a custom activity in the workflow in the Visual Studio Workflow Designer.
5- Use the build utilities in Visual Studio to build the workflow as XAML files.
6- In the Model Editor, refresh the XAML files, which retrieves the model implementation from the Repository and saves the XAML files associated with the model in the Repository.
7- In the Model Editor, create a new instance of the composite application model, and then map the workflow to a software module in the composite application.
8- Prepare the built artifacts for exporting into build packages by adding each artifact file as an opaque resource to the module. The artifact files are dependencies of the XAML files.
9- In the Oslo Module Editor, create a deployable package (.zip file) from the service module.
10- Import the deployable package onto the server.
The Lifecycle for External Application Models
Using Oslo, you can create a model that includes a connection to an external application. If you just need to transport bits to the target system, you can write a WCF transport channel. However, if the target system’s functionality is large and dynamic, you can create a line-of-business adapter for that application using the WCF LOB Adapter SDK. This will give you a service that you can serialize as XAML, save in the Oslo Repository, and then add to a model using Quadrant. This process complements the process for creating, building, and deploying an internal application model.
You will use the following tools when you add a service that connects to an external application to a model:
• WCF LOB Adapter SDK
• Visual Studio LOB Metadata Discovery and Publishing Tool
• Instance Loader
• The Quadrant model editor, including the Composite Application Designer
• The Repository
• Executive LOB Server Driver
To add a service that connects to an external application to a model, you would perform the following steps:
1- Use the WCF LOB Adapter SDK to create an adapter WCF service that makes the connection to, and works with, the external application.
2- Use the Visual Studio LOB Metadata Discovery and Publishing Tool to publish the adapter service.
3- Use the Instance Loader to load the service .dll or XAML into the Repository.
4- Once the service .dll or XAML is in the Repository, use the Quadrant Composite Application Designer to add it to a model.
5- Use the Executive LOB Server Driver to deploy the service .dll or XAML.

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February 1, 2009 - Posted by | .Net 2010 | ,

1 Comment »

  1. Really very userfull article

    Comment by Noura | February 8, 2009 | Reply


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